PAST PRODUCTIONS

CHESS

August 2017 - Arundel Festival Production

CHESS

Music by Björn Ulvaeus & Benny Andersson
Lyrics by Tim Rice
Directed by KATE BENNETT
Musical Direction by BILLY BULLIVANT
Choreographed by ABI VINTER

Chess is used as a metaphor for romantic rivalries and the US-Soviet rivalry during the Cold War. The main characters form a love triangle: the ill-mannered American Grandmaster, the intense Russian champion who plans on defecting to the West, and the Hungarian born female chess second, who arrives at the international championships with the American but falls in love with the Russian. From Bangkok to Budapest, the players, lovers, politicians and spies all struggle to get the upper hand.

WINDOWS 17

August 2017

WINDOWS 17 & WINDOWS 17 PLUS ONE

Written and directed by STUART SMITHERS

THREE BENNETTS

June 2017

THREE BENNETTS

A WOMAN OF NO IMPORTANCE - A VISIT FROM MISS PROTHERO - SOLDIERING ON

By Alan Bennett - Directed by MARGARET MASON

The first is the story of Peggy, who, when a mystery illness strikes, simply changes her comfortable niche at work, for the role of Queen Bee in hospital. Persistently cheerful, blind to the feelings of others, and, at heart, terribly lonely, Peggy is both a moving and comic creation from the pen of a master. In the second, Mr Dodsworth is settling satisfactorily into retirement, when an unwelcome visit from his colleague, Miss Prothero, leaves him unsettled and anxious. Again, Bennett's sure touch, gives us characters who are both touching and funny. In the third, Muriel's husband Ralph has just died, leaving her rather well off - until, that is, her son Giles gets his hands on the money and Muriel comes out the loser. Eventually, neglected by Giles and no longer needed by her disturbed daughter Margaret - whose state may well have been caused by Ralph himself - Muriel ends the play alone and poor.

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED

April 2017

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED

By John Priestley
Directed by TONY HUDSON

In the heart of Northern England three respectable couples, married on the same day, at the same church, and by the same vicar 25 years ago, meet to celebrate their blissful matrimony. Or so they think. Their celebrations are cut short by a sudden and shocking revelation that they are not married at all. As the home truths fly like confetti and conjugal rites turn to farcical fights, an evening of sparkling comic, mayhem erupts. With a reporter and his photographer from the local paper due any minute, a missing housekeeper that knows their secret and a doorbell that won’t stop ringing; can the three couples keep a lid on their circumstances?

RELATIVELY SPEAKING

January 2017

RELATIVELY SPEAKING

By Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by RICHARD GREENHORN

The play opens in Ginny's flat. Ginny is getting ready to have a day out in the country at the home of her lover - Philip. Her intentions - to end the relationship.

Greg wants to spend the day with Ginny, whether that be in the flat or in the country. He believes she is going to visit her parents but is becoming increasingly suspicious of her. He finds the country address and decides to surprise her there.

Greg arrives ahead of Ginny and meets 'the parents' first. Confusion ensues as Greg declares his intentions to marry 'their daughter'.

When Ginny arrives she has no idea what has gone before but eventually has to go along with the story.

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WHOSE LIFE IS IT ANYWAY?

October 2016

WHOSE LIFE IS IT ANYWAY?

by Brian Clark
Directed by GILL LAMBOURN

This is the story of a young man's fight to prove he is fit to make his own decision whether to live or die. First performed in 1978, it remains totally relevant today more than 30 years later. Well into the 21st century we continue to struggle with the complex emotional and legal issues surrounding end of life decisions and this play will give you much to discuss afterwards. But fear not - it is also packed with witty and humorous dialogue and flirting and romance feature as well as thought provoking scenarios.

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THE HISTORY BOYS

August 2016 - Arundel Festival Production

THE HISTORY BOYS

by Alan Bennett
Directed by DAWN SMITHERS
Arundel Festival Production

The History Boys was acclaimed both on stage and in film and is sure to be a successful and memorable festival production. Set in the early 1980s, the play follows a group of history pupils preparing for the Oxford and Cambridge entrance examinations under the guidance of three teachers with contrasting styles.

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AN EMPTY ROOM

August 2016

AN EMPTY ROOM

by Stuart Smithers
Directed by STUART SMITHERS

A man and a woman in an empty room. Why are they there? Who are they and what is their relationship? All will be revealed in this playful piece exploring the themes of unrequited love and moveable truths.

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THE LAST OF THE HAUSSMANS

June 2016

THE LAST OF THE HAUSSMANS

by Stephen Beresford
Directed by PENNIE BILLINGHURST

A many faceted, multi layered first play by Stephen Beresford, better known perhaps as screen play writer for the poignant brilliant film, Pride. Many congratulations and thanks to Pennie Billinghurst, who took on the production slot after Sandee Lewis's departure to Dartmouth. Fine performances from Jane Vrettos and Tonya James (a welcome new member to us) playing mother and daughter, deeply at odds on many levels. Good to welcome so many new actors to the Priory stage, Stevie Lambert was good in the role of son and brother Nick, a wreck of a man, full of demons and insecurities. Poppy Taylor-Jones, Dorothy Olney's grand daughter, was making her acting debut on our stage, giving a really strong performance as the stroppy teenage daughter/grand daughter. Young Max Studdard, playing Daniel was also a welcome addition to the Players. Good, too, to see Nick Rowling back on our stage. So congratulations and thanks to Pennie, her cast and crew for giving us an interesting and complex production.

Margaret Mason

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LOSING LOUIS

April 2016

LOSING LOUIS

by Simon Mendes da Costa
Directed by ROSEY PURCHASE

Rosey says that she likes a challenge and after her last production with its dual set/action, she has taken on "Losing Louis" which constantly switches in time from 60s to the present day. Requiring concentration from the audience and seamless teamwork from the cast it is a difficult play but cast and director rose splendidly to the challenge. Good to welcome two new actresses to our theatre - quite a debut from young Daisy Imbert who was first seen on stage enjoying ecstatic sex under the duvet! Angela Barber had a difficult part, the only one with no humour, but she played it beautifully. Her description of losing her baby was most moving. The remaining cast of well known faces, Matthew Hughes-Short, Steve Wallace, Liz Lawrence, Lucinda Dearlove and Richard Greenhorn, deserve great praise for characterisation and teamwork, for bringing out both the sadness and humour and most of all for remembering all those entrances! Allan, as always, provided a great set - he manages to make our stage look so much bigger than it is! Good to see the picture of David and Lew in the programme, these two have provided so much cheerful support since they were first persuaded into the box. Well done all round.

Dorothy Olney

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MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG

January 2016

MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG

book by George Furth with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Based on the 1934 play of the same name by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart
Directed by KATE BENNETT

I enjoy Sondheim but was unfamiliar this one and it certainly lived up to expectation. The bright white set hung with a variety of jackets to add colour and facilitate easy costume changes was a terrific idea. Being a minimalist I also much approved of the simple but effect set comprising a basic rostra at the back, a small multi-purpose item down stage left that duly represented the bar, the piano and general worktop and a few wooden cubes that were easily moved around the stage to create different locations and add some nice changes of acting levels throughout. There was little if any actual dance but plenty of slick Fosse like movement from a uniformly excellent ensemble. The two main protagonists Franklin and Charley (Wesley Sebastian and Tony Bright respectively) were first class. Tony's patter number was for me and I suspect many others, the highlight of the production. Caroline Bennett as the third member of the friendship trinity was also right on the button. Julie Waite added her vocal talent as Gussie the archetypal Hollywood diva with long suffering husband well portrayed by Miles Eden and Betty Jones absolutely nailed her solo in the role of Beth, Franklin's abandoned first wife and there were some delightful cameo moments from other members of the company. Musically the band was well placed behind the scenes unseen but providing perfect tempo, timing and volume but this meant we were slightly deprived of showing our true appreciation of them at the end. I hope they were aware how much they contributed to a fine performance all round. Well done Kate and the whole team on and off stage for a slick, bright beautifully sung production with loads of energy and attack, thank you all.

Gill Lambourn

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ALL MY SONS

October 2015

ALL MY SONS

by Arthur Miller
Directed by DAWN SMITHERS

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A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS

August 2015 - Arundel Festival Production

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS

by Robert Bolt
Directed by Gill Lambourn

The weather for this year's Arundel Festival was, for the most part, wet and dreary. However, nothing could dampen Gill Lambourn's brilliant production of this deeply thought provoking play. Even after 20 years, it still comes as a surprise to me that so much can be achieved on our tiny stage. Congratulations to Allan, the designer, and Bruce, David and Lew who built this outwardly simple yet ingenious set. The atmospheric lighting and sound captured the period to perfection, and the costumes - oh wow! Pat designed and made everyone of them - all of which could have easily dressed a professional stage. The backstage team of Tony and Jenny (and Dawn!) worked hard to allow everything to flow seamlessly. And the cast? I sat in the audience on the last night, so proudly watching a group of actors, all of whom I know, and who played their parts so expertly, and with such finesse. They were lead by Stuart Smithers as Sir Thomas More, who gave a bravura performance as the highly principled man, showing us his humanity and determination. For me, this is a production which will long rank high in Arundel Players' list of "best of".

Bunny Carnegie

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QUAND MÊME

August 2015

QUAND MÊME

by Stuart Smithers
Directed by Stuart Smithers

From the moment we heard the show's introductory music "Hi Diddle de Dee and actor's life for me", we knew we were in for a good time at the Arundel Player's special morning festival production. "Quand Même" was written and directed by the talented Stuart Smithers who somehow managed to fit this in between preparing for and performing the lead role of Thomas More in "A Man for all Seasons". It was a clever and intriguing idea; in these days of technological innovations a long dead acting legend returns to life and is interviewed on television. It worked brilliantly. Steve Wallace was delicious as the camp chat show host Phil Pinkerton, landed with a real diva. At a loss whether to try charm or condescension he consequently failed at both with delightfully comic results. Dawn Smithers gave just the correct mix of graciousness and star quality as Sarah Bernhardt the acting diva in question. The dialogue delivered great fun and plenty of relevant historical information which was highly satisfactory. The studio interview was neatly interspersed with supposed video clips of Sarah in performance in her heyday brought to life by Tracy Clayton, thus allowing us to see famous monologues from various productions including "The Dame au Camellias" and "Hamlet". The period costumes were beautifully created by Pat Moss who is an absolute treasure to Arundel Players. We, the audience, thoroughly enjoyed ourselves and left the theatre happily discussing exactly who should be the next legend revived on the Phil Pinkerton Show. Deserved congratulations all round!

Gill Lambourn

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WE'LL ALWAYS HAVE PARIS

June 2015

WE'LL ALWAYS HAVE PARIS

by Jill Hyem
Directed by Margaret Mason

Take three English women of a certain age, transplant them to Paris, sit back and see that glorious city restore their joie de vivre. Jill Hyem's gentle and amusing piece sees her three heroines put their pasts behind them and embrace a new and better life in La Belle France. The three former school friends, with their different attitudes and personalities, were portrayed very effectively by Jane Vrettos, Brenda Hargraves and Gill Lambourn. They were admirably supported by Paul Taylor as the French handyman with a weakness for 'les dames anglaises', and Liz Lawrence as the redoubtable French landlady with xenophobic tendencies. The set well reflected the garret flat as described by Jane's character. The sound, including a multitude of telephone ring tones, was always right on cue and the lighting effective and unobtrusive, as good lighting should always be. Ably directed by Margaret Mason, the play provided an all round feel good experience for its audience, albeit with a fair smattering of ripe language from Gill's character. Arundel, vous couvrir les oreilles!!!

Dawn Smithers

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HUMBLE BOY

March 2015

HUMBLE BOY

by Charlotte Jones
Directed by Bunny Carnegie

HUMBLE BOY or, as I like to think of it, Six Characters in Search of Happiness (with apologies to Pirandello). The play takes as its subjects bereavement, loneliness, unrequited love and the meaning of life. Oh and, by the way, it's also very funny. Under the deft direction of Muriel Carnegie, her uniformly talented cast tackled this complex play with verve and enthusiasm, bringing out each and every nuance of humour and pathos. This was an ensemble piece with each character essential to the whole. Jamie Potts as Felix Humble gave a thoughtful and sensitive performance as the eponymous stuttering anti-hero of the piece, who sought his salvation among the intricacies of super string theory, while Rosey Purchase played deliciously against type as his harsh, unfeeling mother. Margaret Mason as Mercy portrayed to a tee Flora's persecuted downtrodden 'friend' who inadvertently mixes James Humble's ashes in her Gazpacho soup with hilarious result. As George Pye, Vic Moss gave a master class in acting drunk (as distinct from drunk acting which is something rather different). Claire Mitchelson as Rosie Pye convincingly demonstrated the art of stage seduction with Felix as her reluctant victim. Last, but by no means least, Roger Booth, as the late James Pye, delighted us with a superbly understated performance. The garden set was a joy to behold, courtesy of Allan Farrow and Joy Talmage who between them also stage managed. The long hours and hard work all this involved should not be underestimated. Michael Nott and Ian Black were responsible for lighting and sound design, operated by yours truly (lighting), with Lew Rigelsford and David Berry (sound), and let's not forget our dedicated prompt, Liz Lawrence. The play in rehearsal suffered various unanticipated setbacks but the finished product was something of which the director should be justly proud.

Stuart Smithers

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THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR

January 2015

THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR

by William Shakespeare
Directed by Mike Wells

For Arundel Players first ever Shakespeare production Mike Wells chose the comedy romp Merry Wives. Just for an added challenge he set it in the 1940s with music of the era and excellent period costumes by Pat Moss further enhancing the ambiance of the evening. The evening began with a smooching Bruce Stewart and Deborah Addicott as a pair of dubious characters performing a neat pick-pocketing manoeuvre on the hapless Slender played by newcomer Jed Macbride. Jed was just one was one of several making debuts with the Players, most notably Nick Roughton who gave a lovely performance as the jealous husband Master Ford. He was well matched by his lively wife Julie Waite and her companion in jolly japes Mistress Page, the talented Liz Lawrence. There were nice cameos from Trevor Roman, Ian Weston, Margaret Mason and in particular Doug Hammond as Doctor Caius. Brenda Merriott was a suitably garrulous Mistress Quickly whilst Matthew Hughes Short as a dashing RAF pilot provided the love interest. Central to the success of the piece of course is Sir John Falstaff and Philip Amore attacked the role of the obese, lecherous, drunken butt of the jokes with his usual enthusiasm and attention to detail. The audience embraced the mood of the evening enjoying all the farcical action, especially the never ending parade of 1940s ladies' underwear flowing from the enormous laundry basket and rewarding the cast with plenty of well earned applause.

Gill Lambourn

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ON THE TOWN

September 2014

ON THE TOWN - 24 Hour Musical

by Betty Comden and Adolph Green
Directed by Kate Bennett

Having watched several 24 hour musicals from the 'side-lines', I have always been in awe of Kate Bennett and her cast and crew. How could they ever put a musical together in just 24 hours without sleep? They always do, and this one was no exception! Congratulations to Kate and all involved. Through their talent and hard work, a packed audience enjoyed a great show, and our two charities The Snowdrop Trust and The Chestnut Tree Children's Hospice benefited by each receiving £600.

Bunny Carnegie

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PRIVATES ON PARADE

August 2014 - Arundel Festival Production

PRIVATES ON PARADE

by Peter Nichols
Directed by Roger Redfarn

Because of its content "Privates On Parade" was always going to be a controversial choice. The story of a gay concert party of national service men during the 1948 Malayan uprising was at times hard hitting and thought-provoking. "It Ain't Half Hot Mum" it was not! However, Roger Redfarn's skill as a director shone through, bringing us the humour and pathos in equal measures, and how he managed to orchestrate 24 scenes on our tiny stage was quite incredible. He was admirably supported by the collective talents of Daniel Paine, the Musical Director, and Kate Bennett, the Choreographer, as well as all those who toiled unstintingly backstage to produce such a brilliant set, costumes, lighting and sound. And the cast? - Congratulations to a great team of talented actors, many of them making their first appearance at the Priory. From day one of rehearsals they worked as a team, and that team spirit was evident throughout the performances. This was a controversial choice, but thank goodness we at Arundel Players choose plays on their merit, and not because they are safe.

Bunny Carnegie

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WORD WAR

May 2014

WORD WAR

by Stuart Smithers
Directed by Stuart Smithers

Arguably Stuart Smithers' best play to date and one of the cleverest productions in the Festival, Word War was a complete tour de force. From the opening, with the sisters asking forward through the years, whether their different perspectives still stand up and which one was right, to the final plea from Sylvia - "Was this the war to end all wars, or the war to end all peace?" Raised by devoted but agnostic parents, both of whom strongly espoused the suffragette movement, the Pankhurst sisters became steadily more and more estranged by the advent of WW1. Christabel is the warmonger, but in the name of God, and Sylvia, the ardent pacifist, because it was "the only rational response to the vicious self perpetuating cycle of aggression". Beautifully costumed and presented, both Lucinda Dearlove and Tracy Clayton showed a very real appreciation of the different views and characters of the two sisters. Stuart's superbly reasoned arguments between the two women make it easy to guess what his day job is! Well done and thank you!

Margaret Mason

GASLIGHT

May 2014

GASLIGHT

by Patrick Hamilton
Directed by Dorothy Olney

The Arundel Players have done it again! Dorothy Olney's atmospheric production of Patrick Hamilton's "Gaslight" hit all the right spots. On the night I was present the members of the audience were practically glued to their seats waiting for the next spine-tingling event. We never had long to wait. The accomplished on-stage actors, including the welcome return of André Bougard who said nothing but looked fantastic and the introduction of Gillian Lambourn and Jamie Craker were magnificently supported by backstage and ops box crew. Allan Farrow again made the small Arundel stage look twice its actual size. How does he do that? Pat Moss's and Derek Easton's costumes and wigs always add significantly to period plays. The sound and lighting people also added to the Victorian atmosphere and the carefully chosen props all enhanced and enveloped us into the era. We wanted to "hiss - boo" Richard Greenhorn's sinister Mr Manningham off the stage every time he bullied and threatened his poor wife Bella, played by the excellent Deborah Addicott. She had no friends except the housekeeper, Elizabeth, sensitively played by Gillian Lambourn. Even Nancy, the flighty young servant girl, seductively played by Jamie Craker, was against her. What a relief to find that Rough, played sympathetically by Philip Amor, was there to help Bella and to bring the wicked Mr Manningham to justice. The gas lighting is, of course, essential to the overall atmosphere of the play, especially when we learn that the living-room lights change from high to low and back again when the criminal Mr Manninham is in the house and attic. Michael Nott had to achieve atmospherically perfect lighting. And he did. What a satisfying evening!

Blanche Robinson

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OTHER HALF

March 2014

HOW THE OTHER HALF LOVES

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Rosey Purchase

An ingenious, funny and brilliantly crafted masterpiece, which juggles time and space to present the lives and loves, passion and panic of three married couples in a play of love and laughter, meals and mayhem. Like all of Alan Ayckbourn's comedies it is about the precise interaction of sex and class in modern English society. Agreed, the first few minutes had the audience, myself included, wondering how the play could possibly work. Allan Farrow's set is almost a character in itself, so important is it to the action. It represents two living-dining rooms at once. The furniture - and often the people of the two places - are intermingled, building to a truly marvellous climax at the end of Act One, involving two dinner parties on different nights played simultaneously. Bob Phillip's liaison with his boss's wife, is in danger of being discovered by their respective spouses. Each attempt to wriggle out of suspicion, by projecting their own infidelity on to a third, totally innocent, uninteresting and unsuspecting couple in the Featherstones. Liz Lawrence gives a memorable performance as the shy, inexperienced Mary Featherstone who finds herself completely out of her depth, while Roger Booth, perfect as her husband, William, finds himself branded as a cuckold when his new boss jumps to all the wrong conclusions. Frank Foster, played by Stuart Smithers, presides over the whole affair with great conviction, never suspecting his own wife, the elegant Fiona, portrayed by the equally elegant Lucinda Dearlove, who forgets their wedding anniversary and unbeknown to him was with Phillips. Richard Greenhorn is perfect as the erring husband Bob Phillips and Tracy Clayton as Teresa Phillips, fully typified the harassed wife and mother, who appears more worried about his drinking than his womanising. Ably supported by an excellent backstage crew of Dawn Hanlon, Joy Talmage, Sue Luke and Allan Farrow, this was an excellent cast superbly directed by Rosey Purchase.

Philip Amor

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DROWSY CHAPERONE

January 2014

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE

Music / lyrics by Lisa Lambert & Greg Morrison
Book by Bob Martin & Don McKellar
Directed by Kate Bennett - Musical Director Julie Mackrill

Having never seen, nor, to my shame, never even heard of THE DROWSY CHAPERONE, I was fascinated to see this production. I was bowled over by Kate's direction, the ingenious set and the enthusiasm and talent of the cast. Topping the bill was Steve Wallace as The Man in the Chair - what a tour de force from this talented actor! He was ably supported by the rest of the cast, who played their larger than life characters with gusto. In the midst of a miserable winter, this was a joyous and delightful interlude.

Muriel Carnegie

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AMADEUS

August 2013 - Arundel Festival Production

AMADEUS

by Peter Shaffer
Directed by Mike Wells

A professional theatre director friend of mine once said the only difference between amateur and professional actors was that amateurs don't get paid. We know, of course, that this is not always the case! However, watching Amadeus last week we saw professionalism at its best, from the magnificent bespoke costumes, lighting and set-design, all topped off with the sound of Mozart's genius. Congratulations to Mike Wells, the director, and to the whole company, led by two stellar performances from Phillip Amor as Salieri and Adrian Kenward as Mozart. Our little theatre has produced so many plays of quality, and having watched this performance, it made me proud to be part of it. As a PS - a big thank you to all the uncredited 'stars' who helped to build the set, and who worked so long and so hard behind the bar and Front of House in all that heat!.

Muriel Carnegie

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BLUE YONDER

August 2013 - Arundel Festival Extra

BLUE YONDER

by Stuart Smithers
Directed by Stuart Smithers

MASS APPEAL

May 2013

MASS APPEAL

by Bill C Davis
Directed by Sandee Lewis

How easy it is to write an appreciation of a play that gave so much pleasure. Sandee Lewis has loved this play for many years, and that love showed itself throughout this gentle, thought-provoking play and in her high standard of direction and attention to detail. Tony Muzzall and David Stephens both gave exemplary performances, seemlessly moving from comedy to tragedy at the blink of an eye - a tour de force from both these talented actors. The set, sound and lighting all contributed to a performance of real quality.

Muriel Carnegie

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ENTERTAINING ANGELS

March 2013

ENTERTAINING ANGELS

by Richard Everett
Directed by Muriel Carnegie

So how could the cast possibly live up to Allan Farrow's superb outdoor set, complete with running stream and shifting skies? Well they did, and how! Under the skilful direction of Muriel Carnegie, an experienced cast, led magnificently by Rosey Purchase, exploited every nuance of this bittersweet comedy of bereavement, betrayal, and ultimate redemption. This was in the best sense of the word an ensemble piece, with strong performances by Blanche Robinson as the missionary fallen from grace, David Bennett as the not so dear departed, Tracy Clayton as the daughter surprised by the prospect of a 30 year old half brother, and Lucinda Dearlove as a rather thinner version of the Vicar of Dibley! Topped off with professional lighting effects, and a sympathetic and original musical score courtesy of Iain Carnegie, the audience was, indeed, entertained by angels.

Stuart Smithers

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CALENDAR GIRLS

January 2013

CALENDAR GIRLS

by Tim Firth
Directed by Margaret Mason

Calendar Girls? --- oh what enormous fun they were! Not only the girls, of course, but also the rest of the talented cast, set-builder, backstage crew and the ops-box inhabitants. The pace was electric, never letting up. The changes of scene and costume (how many changes of costume were there?) all went at a great rate, the high energy levels never flagging. The story of John, the husband who died from leukaemia, is well known but this very sad event was lightened by a script full of joy. The sadness, which brought tears to the eyes, was never dwelled on for long, and laughter soon followed the tears. This uplifting production by Margaret Mason finished with the splendid news that donations and sales of The Calendar Girls Cookbook enabled The Arundel Players to contribute £1000 to the Leukaemia Research Charity. Thank you to all our audiences for their generosity and their enthusiastic reception.

Blanche Robinson

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THE MYSTERIOUS MR LOVE

November 2012

THE MYSTERIOUS MR LOVE

by Karoline Leach
Directed by Brenda Merriott

Loving them and leaving them is George Love's philosophy as he goes through life with a trail of broken hearts in his wake.

The aptly-named serial conman of the Edwardian era selects his victims with care, choosing vulnerable women who are all too ready to be taken in by his improbable tales of a life in the diplomatic corps which has taken him all over the world, mixing with the great and the good.

He woos them and wins them, 'marries' them and then relieves them of their nest eggs, departing without a backward glance - his escape route often being via window.

But is there a kinder side to the mysterious Mr Love? After all, he does believe in giving them a wedding night to remember, leaving them smiling, as he says, and is convinced this quid pro quo is sufficient and mistakenly feeling that his countless deceptions are never cruel.

However, love may prove to be the undoing for George Love (Richard Greenhorn) when he is overwhelmed with sympathy for his latest victim.

Plain and plump, Adelaide Pinchin (Cheryl Jones) works in a milliner's shop, kept behind the scenes in the back room because of her unprepossessing appearance.

As usual, he captures her heart and they wed, but their wedding night is not what he expects. He hears that Adelaide's life has been blighted by her father who has always held her to ridicule because of her ballooning weight.

Despite this, he decides to depart with her £50 nest egg, only to hesitate at the last moment, and when Adelaide discovers his true intentions and is surprised to discover her own inner strengths, finds himself begging her not to abandon him.

Expertly directed by Brenda Merriott,the action never flags, with an excellent script providing plenty of laughs alongside the soul-searching.

Richard and Cheryl magnificently carry off the difficult task of sustaining a play with only two characters and delivering the poignant dialogue to perfection.

Congratulations must also go to Allan Farrow for his set design and Stan Snape and Robert Clarry for the lighting, which really come into their own towards the end of this ambitious but highly-successful production.

The audience is kept guessing until the very last moment over whether Adelaide and Mr Love will remain together, happy or unhappy ever after, or go their separate ways. And I don't think anyone guessed the ending - I wouldn't dream of revealing it to you - that would be a crime!

Joanne Rothery - The Chichester Observer - 12th November 2012

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LITTLE WOMEN

August 2012 - Arundel Festival Production

LITTLE WOMEN

by Louisa M Alcott
Directed by Dawn Smithers

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TWO OF A KIND

June 2012

TWO OF A KIND

by Hugh Janes
Directed by Margaret Mason

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THE GINGERBREAD LADY

March 2012

THE GINGERBREAD LADY

by Neil Simon
Directed by Rosey Purchase

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A MURDER IS ANNOUNCED

January 2012

A MURDER IS ANNOUNCED

by Agatha Christie
Directed by Philip Amor

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THE HEIRESS

November 2011

THE HEIRESS

by Ruth and Augustus Goetz
Directed by Mike Wells

It's an absolute triumph - with The Heiress, Mike Wells' first production for Arundel Players at The Priory Playhouse (until Saturday, November 5) the director has achieved an impressive interpretation of this thought-provoking drama.

Equally so for Lucinda Dearlove as the leading lady and David Bennett, who both turn in outstanding performances, ably supported by a talented cast.

This adaptation of Henry James' novel Washington Square is set in the 1850s and centres on the relationship between Dr Austin Sloper (played by Bennett), a wealthy and cultivated American physician, and his daughter Catherine (played by Dearlove).

A widower, he feels his daughter cannot live up to the beauty and charm of her mother who died giving birth to her. He regards her as 'mediocre, defenceless, without a trace of poise' and his attitude has resulted in Catherine growing up timid and shy, with no sense of her own worth.

Tentatively, her life begins to change when she meets the handsome Morris Townsend and it is touching to see her begin to blossom under his spell. Her happiness is short-lived when her father, convinced Morris is a fortune hunter, nips her nascent confidence in the bud by telling her that her suitor can only be after her inheritance as she is not worthy of a man's love and her only asset is her money.

This signals the move from the well-portrayed formality of the early part of the play, reflecting an age when women knew their place and where failure to achieve a good marriage left them condemned to mediocrity, to an emotionally-charged second act.

The characterisation throughout is excellent, but the highlight is Catherine's stunning performance as her illusions are stripped away and her heart is broken.

Joanne Rothery - The Chichester Observer - 2nd November 2011

SLEEPING PRINCE

August 2011 - Arundel Festival Production

THE SLEEPING PRINCE

by Terence Rattigan
Directed by Dorothy Olney
Commanding display applauded at Arundel Players' festival turn

Renewed enthusiasm for the works of Terence Rattigan has been encouraged at Arundel Festival by a revival of one of his best comedies. A special season at neighbouring Chichester is celebrating the Brighton playwright's centenary with some of his more serious endeavours.

By contrast, Arundel Players decided to introduce local audiences to a royal laughter-maker called The Sleeping Prince. I use the word "royal" advisedly in connection with this sparkling gem of a play since it has many royal connotations, not least of which is the fact that it was written in 1953 to mark the Queen's coronation. It deals with the political intrigues and romantic affairs of a seemingly stuffy bunch of royals, albeit foreign ones from eastern Europe. The play is set against the backdrop of the coronation of King George V, 100 years ago. Rattigan himself died in 1977, the year of the Queen's silver jubilee.

You can't beat really good writing and Rattigan's plays were so brilliantly crafted they have survived to enjoy once again the acclamation they richly deserve.

The action of The Sleeping Prince takes place in the Belgravia Square embassy, in London, where the Carpathian Prince regent and his party have assembled for the coronation.

The regent, who is ruling his country until his son Nicholas is old enough to ascend the throne and is doing it ruthlessly, is a notorious womaniser. The Foreign office has been asked to provide him wit ha showgirl for the evening, invited to dine as a prelude to seduction.

Chosen for this chore is an American musical comedy performer with the stage name of Elaine Dagenham who is not slow to realise what the Regent is up to. Their clash of cultures, intentions and personalities - she is young, bright and warm-hearted while he is middle-aged, cold and unfeeling - leads to many funny situations. Dedicated director and Rattigan fan, Dorothy Olney, handled the Arundel production with great care, coaxing excellent performances from the entire cast and in the process creating an evening of sublime pleasure.

Ruth Roberts was quite simply a delight as the indefatigable and surprisingly worldly-wise Miss D. She illustrated her skill with this type of gentle comedy in a cherishable encounter with the impossibly (but amusingly) autocratic Grand Duchess. This role was extremely well played by Jane Blackford. The all important figure of the Regent proved a triumph for Vic Moss, with a commanding display in a difficult assignment. Mitch Reeves showed promise and made his presence felt as the frustrated young king-in-waiting, while Mark Roberts successfully characterised the overly deferential British attached Peter Northbrook.

There were notable contributions, too, from Dennis Harrison, Alan Barlow, Siggy Hills, Jenny Greig, Lauren Mold and Blanch Robinson.

Brian Shewry - The Herald and Gazette - 1st September 2011

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FAITH HEALER

June 2011

FAITH HEALER

by Brian Friel
Directed by Margaret Mason

Utterly compelling - that was the atmosphere which gripped the audience throughout Arundel Players' thought provoking production of the Faith Healer.

Brian Friel's complex play was an enormous challenge for the Players' cast of three, but one they rose to magnificently.

Beautifully scripted, the story of itinerant faith healer Frank Hardy is told in a series of lengthy monologues, firstly by Frank, played by Philip Amor, and then by his wife Grace (Rosey Purchase) and his manager Teddy (Antony Muzzall).

Their lives have been inextricably linked for two decades and one by one they reveal their vastly different perspectives of those years together.

The fascination lies in how three people who have been so close recount the same triumphs and tragedies and while the kernel of these incidents remains the same, the emotions they arouses and the effect on their lives differ so widely.

Amor, Purchase and Muzzall did a superb job of portraying how it is possible for incidents to be perceived from opposing viewpoints, keeping the audience enthralled from start to finish.

Jo Rothery - The Chichester Observer - June 2011

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2011

HABEAS CORPUS

by Alan Bennett
Directed by Barry Jarvis

A CHORUS OF DISAPPROVAL

January 2011

A CHORUS OF DISAPPROVAL

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Muriel Carnegie

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2010

WEEKEND BREAKS

Directed by Dawn Smithers

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS

August 2010 - Arundel Festival Production

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS

by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman
Directed by Kate Bennett

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VOICES

June 2010

VOICES

by Ian Hornby
Directed by Ian Black

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2010

BLOOD BROTHERS (24 Hour Musical)

Directed by Kate Bennett

THE MEMORY OF WATER

March 2010

THE MEMORY OF WATER

by Shelagh Stephenson
Directed by Rosie Purchase

There was a tidal wave of emotions - and some extremely strong performances - throughout Arundel Players' production of the Memory of Water.

The award-winning tragic-comedy traces the story of three disparate sisters brought together by their mother's death. Streams of black comedy and pathos ebb and flow side by side as the three women share their differing recollections of family events and squabble over what actually happened.

Resentful Teresa (Liz Lawrence), the eldest daughter, never ceases to remind her siblings she had borne the brunt of caring for their mother once Alzheimer's had set in, and that she has now carried the burden of making the funeral arrangements.

Then there's attention seeking and delusional Catherine (Deborah Addicott), the youngest and most obviously vulnerable. Self-centred and insensitive, her memories of family events and her sense of always being sidelined are perhaps the most distorted of all. Middle sister Mary (Tracy Clayton) is a doctor, involved in a long standing affair with a married man, a fellow medic. Outwardly the most stable of the three, the secret she has struggled to conceal for many years is the saddest of all.

The first act which sets the scene for the complex relationships and how the women come to terms with the death of their parent is strong enough in itself, filled with love. Laughter and tears and even anger, but it's in the second act the play really comes into its own. It begins with an enormously powerful scene between Mary and the ghost of her mother (Chrissy Horgan), both of them stunningly portrayed, and goes on to reveal lies and long-buried secrets.

As the sisters reveal their insecurities, and battle their demons, they receive strong support from Mary's lover, Mike (Richard Greenhorn) and Teresa's husband, Frank (Roger Booth).

This journey into the bywaters of deceptive memories and rivalries is a challenging play, but on to which the cast rose magnificently.

Jo Rothery - The Chichester Observer - April 2010

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RELATIVE VALUES

January 2010

RELATIVE VALUES

by Noël Coward
Directed by Margaret Mason
A drop of snowy weather will not dampen spirits of Arundel Players.

The show must go on - and the Arundel Players made sure it did at the opening night of Relative Values on Monday evening, despite the horrendous weather which had disrupted their final rehearsals. Bravo to the determined and talented cast and to the hardy souls who braved the icy streets of Arundel to reach the theatre. "It's been nerve-wracking, but all the cast have been marvellous," said director Margaret Mason. "The rehearsal last Tuesday had to be abandoned when the heavy snow started to fall, but although most of the cast live outside Arundel, they all managed to get here somehow for the other rehearsals and were absolutely determined we should go ahead." Everyone's efforts were amply rewarded with the lively performance of Noël Coward's classic satire of snobbery - which continues to January 16th.

One of the Master's less well-known works, with Margaret at the helm, it was a delightful depiction of an aristocratic family and their domestic staff steeped in the traditions of a social order which was rapidly being eroded. Both classes feared the consequences of the breakdown of social barriers, reflected in the betrothal of the son and heir to a 'common, painted hussy' from Hollywood, regarding it as another nail in the coffin of their well-ordered lives. The Arundel Players production has been cast to perfection, each member totally in character to act out the nuances of the inevitable clash of cultures in the tale of ladies' maid Moxie whose life is turned upside down when she realises the new fiancé of her mistress's son is her long-lost film star sister.

The undoubted star of the show is Dorothy Olney as the matriarch of the aristocratic Marshwood family - her timing is perfect as she delivers a host of sardonic bon mots, while Roger Menhenett is equally impressive as Crestwell the butler. Richard Greenhorn comes over well as the calming presence of the Hon Peter Ingleton, Tracy Clayton tackles the role of screen goddess Miranda Frayle with great gusto and Maureen Haynes agonises convincingly over her plight. They are superbly backed up by the rest of the cast and this wonderful romp through the social revolution of 1950s Britain is complemented by a superb set and stunning costumes.

Jo Rothery - Chichester Observer - 14th January 2010

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HEDDA GABLER

November 2009

HEDDA GABLER

by Henrik Ibsen
Directed by Paul Ward

Arundel Players did full justice to Ibsen's disturbing and dramatic tale of a discontented and manipulative woman for whom mundane domesticity can never be enough.

The play opens with the warmth shared between doting aunt Juliane (Micki Darbyshire) and her bumbling newly-wed nephew George Tesman (Neill Blume), just returned from a six-month honeymoon with his bride, Hedda.

That warmth rapidly dissipates with the entrance of Hedda. Beth McGee-Russell ably embracing the role of one of the most unlovable yet intriguing women in the history of theatre. You quickly realise this is not simply a chapter in the life of a bored housewife whose husband is immersed in dull academic life, but a self-obsessed woman who is riddled with frustration and jealousy. Beth McGee-Russell plays the chilling role of the anti-heroine with impressive insight and flair.

The rest of the cast also capture their characters to perfection, and special mention must go to Philip Amor as a splendidly lascivious Judge Brack.

Jo Rothery - The Chichester Observer - 5th November 2009

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THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST

August 2009 - Arundel Festival Production

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST

by Oscar Wilde
Directed by Philip Amor

One of the finest comedies in the English language - the very best, according to some - is Arundel Players' contribution to the town festival.

Their production of Oscar Wilde's masterpiece in on view at Prior Playhouse, where it is attracting full houses. But, if somehow you can still get a ticket, grab it. For this elegant, high comedy of manners, morals (and errors) receives the immaculate treatment it deserves under the careful direction of Philip Amor. He has wisely decided not to tamper with something that is already perfection and the result is an evening of sparkling entertainment.

Not only are there high-standard performances by a well-chosen cast, with all that polished wit and sarcasm in ace and those oft-quoted epigrams delivered to full effect.

The show has also been staged on a fairly sumptuous scale, with attractive sets (designed by Allan Farrow) and eye-catching costumes (check out Lady Bracknell's extravagant hats).

Muriel Carnegie is entirely successful at making Lady Bracknell the formidable character that Wilde undoubtedly envisaged. She is not on stage a lot, but is so commanding when she is. Peter Coxon (Jack) and Matthew Hughes-Short (Algernon) both give the self-assured performances essential for firmly anchoring the production. They do excellent work and have delightful stage partners in Beth McGee-Russell (Gwendolen) and Sarah Blackford (Cecily). Outwardly demure, but suppressing ardent feelings (for the rector, no less!), Miss Prism is joyously brought to life by Blanche Robinson. Canon Chasuble, barely hiding his own amorous feelings under his dog collar, is a role quite safely entrusted to Barry Jarvis, who has more than 40 years in amateur and professional theatre to his credit. As portrayed by David Blackford and Derek Billington, the manservant (Lane) and the butler (Merriman) remain aloof and properly dignified throughout.

Brian Shewry - The Littlehampton Gazette - August 27th 2009

It was a very important milestone in Philip Amor's life when he directed the Arundel players in The Importance of Being Earnest as part of Arundel Festival - and what a superb job he made with this production of the ever popular classic by Oscar Wilde. It was the first time Philip had directed a play which he had not written himself, a fact he had not confessed even to the cast until almost the end of the week long run at the Priory Playhouse.

But he did this wonderful comedy of manners full justice, his unerring eye picking out a beautiful cast who gelled magnificently along with simple yet elegant stage sets and lighting which set the scene of genteel Victorian life to perfection.

Philip wisely decided on a traditional approach to Wilde' superb play - after all, the script itself was a defining moment in creating a highly amusing parody of the English upper classes of the time, bitingly amusing yet affectionately making fun of them with light- hearted satire and sparkling wit. A successful production however, however, relies on the strength of the characters, and here the director chose wisely and well. There was a tremendous between them all which shone through every scene, especially in the duologues between various different pairings. This was apparent right from the start as the two young men about town, Algernon Moncrieff (Matthew Hughes-Short) and Jack Worthing (Peter Coxon) set the scene by revealing they had both invented imaginary characters to aid them in avoiding distasteful situations. It's hard to believe that Matthew is only 19, as his performance displays a high level of maturity and confidence, while Peter demonstrates great stage presence and style.

Gwendolen, his intended is played by Beth McGee-Russell, excelling as the elegant but delightfully dippy young lady. At the heart of the play, of course, is Gwendolen's mother, the formidable Lady Bracknell.

Philip made an inspired choice in Muriel Carnegie. She strides onto the stage like a galleon in full sail and delivers Wilde's acerbic bon mots with perfect timing and aplomb. As Jack reveals the mystery of his parentage her responses, uttered in a tone of stunned stupefaction, are among the evening's great comic moments.

Jo Rothery - The Chichester Observer - September 3rd 2009

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MY OWN SHOW

June 2009

MY OWN SHOW

by Lesley Bruce
Directed by Penelope Billinghurst
Witty take on fading star.

This satirical piece directed by Pennie Billinghurst with a cast of just four mature ladies + one young man, takes place in a smart sitting room that doubles as the TV stage set for Frankly Fay.

Fay, a cold-hearted fading daytime TV celebrity has just returned home, with two of her old school friends, after starring in This is Your Life. The show has not gone well, with a distinct lack of eminent guests, and Fay is in no mood to party! Their post-mortem on the evenings events turns to reminiscing about their childhood bullying of a former school pupil - Bollards (Caroline Pollard). An unexpected knock on the door and a larger-than-life highly excitable Bollards appears, along with her inept son Allan, he being the result of her marriage to the geography teacher! The four of them discuss their achievements in the world and the suspicious circumstances surrounding Bollards widowhood give Fay the idea to try and turn around her failing ratings by inviting Bollards to appear on her TV show. Caroline is an immediate success, but then begins to systematically take over Fay's life, home, clothes and ultimately TV show!

Rosey Purchase (Caroline Pollard) has returned to the spotlight and shone throughout as she played this complicated personality, with great aplomb. A stalwart member of the Arundel Players, taking on many roles from Director to back stage, but this performance would suggest she "tread the boards" more frequently. Muriel Carnegie (Fay) gave a great rendition of the spoilt over-indulged declining star with her snappy comments and lack of loyalty to her friends. Andre Bougard in the role of the young man Allan was memorable and entertaining with his sudden unexpected outbursts. Gillian, the brittle disgruntled head hunter and Jude the dowdy academic, were played by Margaret Mason and Hilary Riddell respectively.

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IN CONFIDENCE

April 2009

IN CONFIDENCE

by Deborah Amor
Four very different confidential snapshots.

Deborah Amor is both the writer and director for the Arundel Players latest production. She has been influenced by Alan Bennett's Talking Heads and for the past few years has been successfully writing monologues, as her preferred genre. Those chosen depict four wildly differing personalities and are written with great depth and perception. Her attention to detail and observation is both humorous and poignant. Using a bare set and merely a chair with the addition of a few minimal props, the spotlight was clearly on the solo performer.

The first Getting the Job Done features Fenella Watson, a brassy single 30 something office worker. She begins by relating her lunch date with a female friend and talks us through her previous romantic liaisons, her need for a 'tame handyman' and the ups and downs in her failed relationships. Catherine Wildsmith, making her debut with the Arundel Players, took on the role of this lively young woman and gave a good performance, recounting her witty and comic carnal experiences.

Next up was Tie Break ~ an ambitious late 20's sporty estate agent Anthony Pennington, currently dating a gorgeous older woman but fancied by both his boss and her young daughter. Recounting his relationship with his mother through to a horrific and unexpected ending. Played by Toby Pardoe, who excelled as the charismatic character ~ totally bringing the young man to life, not only with his amusing anecdotes but also such pathos as the hideous events unfold. Toby is a regular with the company and remains the sole performer of this particular monologue.

Ladder of Success sees Gary Baldwin, an uninspiring window cleaner with a fascination for Shakin Stevens. He talks us through his ambitions, unsatisfactory love life and a slot at the local talent show. Yet again an unfortunate conclusion to his situation. Roger Booth, who has been involved with many local theatre groups over a period of years, does justice to the part and gives a moving portrayal of this rather pitiful and inadequate man.

Lastly comes Holiday of a Lifetime featuring Cynthia Felton. She has just returned from a trip to Tenerife and discovers her elderly bed-ridden mother has died during her absence. Before unpacking she reminisces over her life, the injustice and resentment she feels for her overbearing father who has deprived her of marriage and a family. She ultimately becomes the carer to her failing parents and once more there is a sinister twist. This was an excellent performance by Penelope Rooth, who has a wealth of theatrical experience. She revelled in the part as the devout daughter manifesting into the bitter resentful hard done by spinster!

An entertaining production of some well written narratives.

Jill Lawrie

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ART

March 2009

ART

by Yasmin Reza
Directed by Margaret Mason
Trio of players create masterpiece.

Housed in the western wing of a thirteenth century priory, this gem of a theatre is the home of the Arundel players, an innovative group producing five varied productions a year, in this intimate but beautifully restored building.

Art has had tremendous international success and is a marvellously simple story about art and friendship. Serge buys a modern white painting for a considerable sum (200,000 French francs) which is basically a canvas 5' x 4' with a few white lines! First he shows it to his friend Marc who ridicules the purchase and secondly to Yvan who to a degree plays along with the pretence. As the dialogue flows the age old question ~ "What is art?" is pushed to its limits until the painting is almost irrelevant and their actual 15 year friendship is on the line! Unbelievably the tempo hots up to such an extreme even Yvan's impending marriage arrangements are condemned and pulled into the fray!

Director Margaret Mason, using a minimalist modern living room as the set, has excelled with this very entertaining but challenging production. Richard Greenhorn (Yvan) a regular with this company, was brilliant as the ambivalent friend whose personal life gets dragged into the more heated moments, his admission to 6 years of therapy, a scuffle and ultimately tears! The competent Stuart Smithers (Serge) brought great character to his role of the aloof art loving dermatologist, and new comer David Williams (Marc) as the straight talking aeronautical engineer was equally impressive. The chemistry between these three as they bounced from criticism, compassion, slander and eccentricity was palpable and the inspired ending was much applauded by an appreciative audience.

Jill Lawrie

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2009

PULL THE OTHER ONE

by Norman Robbins
Directed by Yvonne Baker

2008

ABIGAIL'S PARTY

by Mike Leigh
Directed by Muriel Carnegie

2008

DAMES AT SEA (24 Hour Musical)

Directed by Kate Bennett

2008 - Arundel Festival Production

THE WORLD GOES' ROUND

Directed by Kate Bennett

2008

ON GOLDEN POND

by Ernest Thompson
Directed by Rosey Purchase

2008

LAST TANGO IN WHITBY

by Mike Harding
Directed by Simon Edwards

2007

ALAN BENNETT - A TRIPLE BILL

by Alan Bennett
Directed by Margaret Mason

2007

SNOOPY - THE MUSICAL (24 Hour Musical)

Directed by Kate Bennett

2007 - Arundel Festival Production

THE RIVALS

by Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Directed by Muriel Carnegie

2007

THERE GOES THE BRIDE

by Ray Cooney
Directed by Yvonne Baker

2007

THE CHALK GARDEN

by Enid Bagnold
Directed by Penelope Rooth

2006

NUNCRACKERS

Directed by Kate Bennett

2006

THE WINSLOW BOY

by Terence Rattigan
Directed by Gerry Lee-Uff Zyms

2006

GREASE (24 Hour Musical)

Directed by Kate Bennett

2006 - Arundel Festival Production

THE PRIME OF MISS JEAN BRODIE

Jay Presson Allen
Directed by Penelope Rooth

2006

A BAKER'S WIFE

Directed by Kate Bennett

2006

THE MARQUISE

by Noël Coward
Directed by Paul Ward

2006

A CHRISTMAS CAROL

by Charles Dickens
Directed by Margaret Mason

2005

A CUPBOARD UNDER THE STAIRS

Directed by Philip Amor

2005 - Arundel Festival Production

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

Directed by Kate Bennett

2005

DANCING AT LUGHNASA

by Brian Friel
Directed by Margaret Mason

2005

HOT MIKADO (24 Hour Musical)

Directed by Kate Bennett

2005

FUTURE IMPERFECT

Directed by Penelope Rooth

2004

AN EVENING AT THE MUSIC HALL AND MELODRAMA

Directed by Kate Bennett

2004

GHOSTS

by Henrik Ibsen
Directed by Penelope Rooth

2004 - Arundel Festival Production

BY JEEVES

Directed by Kate Bennett

2004

THEFT

by Eric Chappell
Directed by Yvonne Baker

2004

QUARTET

by Ronald Harwood
Directed by Margaret Mason

2004

THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD

Directed by Kate Bennett

2003

FALLEN ANGELS

by Noël Coward
Directed by Dorothy Olney

2003 - Arundel Festival Production

SISTER AMNESIA'S COUNTRY WESTERN NUNSENSE JAMBOREE

Directed by Kate Bennett

2003

NATURAL CAUSES

by Eric Chappell
Directed by Pennie Billinghurst

2003

STAGES

Directed by Margaret Mason

2003

AN ITALIAN STRAW HAT

by Eugène Marin Labiche
Directed by Dorothy Olney

2002

PAINTING CHURCHES

by Tina Howe
Directed by Gerry Lee-Uff Zyms

2002 - Arundel Festival Production

SIDE BY SIDE BY SONDHEIM

Directed by Kate Bennett

2002

SUDDENLY LAST SUMMER

by Tennessee Williams
Directed by Terry Fletcher

2002

RELATIVELY SPEAKING

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Michael R. Edgley

2002

THE IMAGINARY INVALID

by Jean Baptiste Moliere
Directed by Pennie Billinghurst

2001 - Arundel Festival Production

THE BOYFRIEND

Directed by Sally Davis

2001

THE ODD COUPLE (Female Version)

by Neil Simon
Directed by Dorothy Olney

2001

SEE HOW THEY RUN

by Philip King
Directed by Pennie Billinghurst

2001

NUNSENSE II

Directed by Kate Bennett

2000

PRIDE AND PREJUDICE

Directed by Dawn Smithers

2000 - Arundel Festival Production

THE RINK

Directed by Kate Bennett

2000

TALKING HEADS (4 One Acts)

by Alan Bennett
Directed by Dawn Smithers, Adrian Woolcott, Terry Fletcher, Stuart Smithers

2000

THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE

by C. S. Lewis
Directed by Jan Bryan

1999

NUNSENSE

Directed by Kate Bennett

1999 - Arundel Festival Production

DAISY PULLS IT OFF

by Denise Deegan
Directed by Dawn Smithers

1999

ASSASSINS

Directed by Kate Bennett

1999

CURTAINS

Directed by Ralph Wigg

1999

TOM JONES

Directed by Jan Bryan

1998

TAKING SIDES

by Ronald Harwood
Directed by Adrian Woolcott

1998

THE HOLLOW CROWN

by John Barton
Directed by Arthur Foster

1998 - Arundel Festival Production

THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE

Directed by Kate Bennett

1998

A BUSINESS OF MURDER

Directed by Stuart Smithers

1998

SEASON'S GREETINGS

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Margaret Mason

1998

ANNIE

Directed by Sally Davis

1997

THE BOY WITH A CART (One Act)

Directed by Rosemary Hagedorn

1997

THE GLASS MENAGERIE

by Tennessee Williams
Directed by Rosey Purchase

1997 - Arundel Festival Production

OH WHAT A LOVELY WAR

Directed by Dawn Smithers

1997

THE DRESSER

by Ronald Harwood
Directed by Dorothy Olney

1997

THE LION IN WINTER

by James Goldman
Directed by Pennie Billinghurst

1997

CIDER WITH ROSIE

by Laurie Lee
Directed by Jan Bryan

1996

STEEL MAGNOLIAS

by Robert Harling
Directed by Margaret Mason

1996 - Arundel Festival Production

WEST SIDE STORY

Directed by Kate Bennett

1996

BEYOND REASONABLE DOUBT

by Jeffrey Archer
Directed by Dawn Smithers

1996

COME AS YOU ARE (4 One Acts)

Directed by Jan Bryan, James Norton, Jan Bryant, Dorothy Olney

1996

THE WIZARD OF OZ

Directed by Sally Davis

1995

SHIRLEY VALENTINE

by Willy Russell
Directed by Martyn Broad

1995 - Arundel Festival Production

PYGMALION

Directed by Terry Fletcher

1995

THE MAINTENANCE MAN

by Richard Harris
Directed by Dawn Smithers

1995

ELEGY FOR A LADY (One Act) CONNAUGHT

by Arthur Miller
Directed by Ralph Wigg

1995

TRAP FOR A LONELY MAN

Directed by Stuart Smithers

1995

PINOCCHIO

Directed by Dorothy Olney

1994

SHADOWLANDS

by William Nicholson
Directed by Jan Bryan

1994 - Arundel Festival Production

DAMES AT SEA

Directed by Kate Bennett

1994

TAKE IT TO THE GREEN LIGHT, BARRY

by Vanessa Brooks
Directed by Bill Brennan

1994

ALBERT (One Act)

by Richard Harris
Directed by Jan Bryant

1994

THE WAITING ROOM (One Act)

by John Bowen
Directed by Mavis Fletcher

1994

ARMS AND THE MAN

by Bernard Shaw
Directed by Terry Fletcher

1993

MY MOTHER SAID I NEVER SHOULD

by Charlotte Keatley
Directed by Dawn Smithers

1993 - Arundel Festival Production

FANTASTICS

Directed by Kate Bennett

1993

TAKING STEPS

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Bill Brennan

1993

PITY ABOUT KITTY

by Jimmie Chinn
Directed by Ralph Wigg

1993

LETTICE AND LOVAGE

by Peter Shaffer
Directed by Jan Bryan

1993

WIND IN THE WILLOWS

Directed by Dorothy Olney

1992

I LOVE MY LOVE

by Fay Weldon
Directed by Stuart Smithers

1992

WORDS OF ADVICE (One Act)

Directed by Stuart Smithers

1992 - Arundel Festival Production

SWEENEY TODD

Directed by Geraldine Lee-Uff

1992

TONS OF MONEY

by Will Evans and Arthur Valentine
Directed by Terry Fletcher

1992

A DAY IN THE DEATH OF JOE EGG (One Act)

by Peter Nichols
Directed by Dawn Smithers

1992

ALADDIN

Directed by Jan Bryan

1991

EXORCISM

by Eugene O'Neill
Directed by Pennie Grant

1991 - Arundel Festival Production

COMPANY

Directed by Kate Bennett

1991

JUST BETWEEN OURSELVES

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Stuart Smithers

1991

THE VIGIL

by Ladislas Fodor
Directed by Terry Fletcher

1991

BLITHE SPIRIT

by Noël Coward
Directed by Jan Bryan

1990

DANGEROUS OBSESSION

by N.J. Crisp
Directed by Pennie Billinghurst

1990 - Arundel Festival Production

CABARET

Directed by Terry Fletcher

1990

STEPPING OUT

by Richard Harris
Directed by Dawn/Stuart Smithers

1990

ORANGE SOUFFLE (One Act)

by Saul Bellow
Directed by Bill Brennan

1990

PACK OF LIES

by Hugh Whitemore
Directed by Jan Bryan

1990

MY THREE ANGELS

by Bella Spewack and Albert Husson
Directed by Pennie Billinghurst

1989

84 CHARING CROSS ROAD

by James Roose Evans
Directed by Jan Bryan

1989 - Arundel Festival Production

THE HIRED MAN

Directed by Geraldine Lee-Uff

1989

TABLE MANNERS

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Bill Brennan

1989

DEADLY NIGHTCAP

by Francis Durbridge
Directed by Ken Dyer

1989

TICKETS PLEASE (One Act)

Directed by Terry Fletcher

1989

FOLLOW THE STAR

Directed by Patsy Cooke

1988

POKER SESSION

Directed by Terry Fletcher

1988 - Arundel Festival Production

MAN OF LA MANCHA

Directed by Geraldine Lee-Uff

1988

OUTSIDE EDGE

by Richard Harris
Directed by Jan Bryan

1988

I'LL BE BACK BEFORE MIDNIGHT!

by Peter Colley
Directed by Ken Dyer

1988

WAVING TO A TRAIN (One Act)

Directed by Bill Brennan

1988

CINDERELLA

Directed by Terry Fletcher

1987

WHOSE LIFE IS IT ANYWAY

by Brian Clark
Directed by Patsy Cooke

1987 - Arundel Festival Production

LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS

Directed by Ken Dyer

1987

GOLDEN PATHWAY ANNUAL (One Act)

by John Burrows and John Harding
Directed by Martyn Broad

1987

TRANSLATIONS

by Brian Friel
Directed by Bill Brennan

1987

THE CURIOUS MRS SAVAGE

Directed by Terry Fletcher

1986

HOBSON'S CHOICE

by Harold Brighouse
Directed by Patsy Cooke

1986 - Arundel Festival Production

SMIKE

Directed by Pat Jones

1986

SISTERLY FEELINGS

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Bill Brennan

1986

THE ENTERTAINER

by John Osborne
Directed by Edward Tulley

1986

ONE SEASON'S KING (One Act)

by George McEwan Green
Directed by Ken Dyer

1986

MARIA MARTEN

Directed by Ken Dyer

1985

THE LITTLE HUT

Directed by Maurice Hilliard

1985

SEE HOW THEY RUN

by Philip King
Directed by Roy Grant

1985

HABEAS CORPUS (One Act)

by Alan Bennett
Directed by Martyn Broad

1984

HARVEY

Directed by Jim Smith

1984 - Arundel Festival Production

TWO BY TWO

Directed by Pat Jones/Duncan Hanna

1984

JOURNEY'S END

by R.C. Sherriff
Directed by Edward Tulley

1984

THE SEA

by Edward Bond
Directed by Bill Brennan

1984

LUNCH HOUR (One Act)

by John Mortimer
Directed by Ken Dyer

1984

PLAY (One Act)

by Samuel Beckett
Directed by Bill Brennan

1984

THINKING ALOUD (One Act)

Directed by Ken Dyer

1984

HABEAS CORPUS

by Alan Bennett
Directed by Martyn Broard

1983 - Arundel Festival Production

HALF A SIXPENCE

Directed by Pat Jones/John Elliott

1983

ALPHABETICAL ORDER

by Michael Frayn
Directed by Edward Tulley

1983

BETWEEN MOUTHFULS (One Act)

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Pat Jones

1983

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED

by J. B. Priestley
Directed by Leslie Baker

1982

CALLIOPE

Directed by Richard Whittaker

1982 - Arundel Festival Production

VICTORIANARAMA

Directed by Pat Jones

1982

LET'S GET A DIVORCE

Directed by Jim Smith

1982

THE HOLE (One Act)

by N.F. Simpson
Directed by Richard Whittaker

1982

ON MONDAY NEXT

by Philip King
Directed by Pat Jones

1981

THE INCREDIBLE VANISHING

Directed by Rosemary Hagedorn

1981

ALADDIN

Directed by S. Pearson/Pat Jones

1981 - Arundel Festival Production

ME AND MY GIRL

Directed by Pat Jones/John Elliott

1981

A PHOENIX TOO FREQUENT (One Act)

by Christopher Fry
Directed by Pat Jones

1981

MURDER WITH LOVE

Directed by Betty Ashton

1980

ABSURD PERSON SINGULAR

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Pat Jones/Sue Alder

1980 - Arundel Festival Production

THE BOYFRIEND

Directed by Roy Grant

1980

DANGEROUS CORNER

by J.B. Priestley
Directed by Peter Lee-Uff

1980

THE COLLECTION (One Act)

Directed by Bill Brennan

1980

RING ROUND THE MOON

by Jean Anouilh
Directed by Jim Smith

1979

THE HEARTLESS PRINCESS

Directed by Richard Whittaker

1979 - Arundel Festival Production

DEPRESSED? WHO'S DEPRESSED?

Directed by Bill Brennan

1979

GEORGE AND MARGARET

Directed by Roy Grant

1979

I SPY

Directed by Bill Brennan

1979

THE DOCK BRIEF

by John Mortimer
Directed by Bill Brennan

1978

THE SECRETARY BIRD

by William Douglas-Home
Directed by Norman Merriott

1978 - Arundel Festival Production

BERTIE'S BRACING SEASIDE SHOW

Directed by Roy Grant

1978

SUDDENLY AT HOME

by Francis Durbridge
Directed by Betty Ashton

1978

PLATITUDES (One Act)

Directed by Betty Ashton

1978

THE LONG DISTANCE PIANO PLAYER

Directed by Bill Brennan

1978

THE HAPPY JOURNEY

Directed by John Godfrey

1978

THE TINDERBOX (Xmas)

Directed by Roy Grant

1977

TIME AND AGAIN

Directed by Richard Whittaker

1977

THE LADY'S NOT FOR BURNING

by Jean Anouilh
Directed by Bill Brennan

1977

THIS BOY CONNER (One Act)

Directed by Richard Whittaker

1976

THE DUMB WAITER (One Act)

by Harold Pinter
Directed by Bill Brennan

1976

THE CHALK GARDEN

by Enid Bagnold
Directed by Betty Ashton

1976

SANTASMAGORIA (Revue)

Directed by Bill Brennan

1975

ONE WINTER NIGHT

Directed by Rosemary Hagedorn

1975

THE RIVALS

by Richard Brinsley Sheridan
Directed by Rosemary Hagedorn

1975

A LADY MISLAID

Directed by Betty Ashton

1975

ALBERT'S BRIDGE (One Act)

by Tom Stoppard
Directed by Bill Brennan

1975

SPRING AND PORT WINE

Directed by Betty Ashton

1974

SUSSEX SHEPHERDS PLAY

Directed by Richard Whittaker

1974

THE REAL INSPECTOR HOUND

by Tom Stoppard
Directed by Bill Brennan

1974

A TREASURE

Directed by Rosemary Hagedorn

1974

SUMMERSALTS (Revue)

Directed by Bill Brennan

1974

POST HORN GALLOP

by Derek Benfield
Directed by Norman Merriott

1973

THE SCHOOL FOR WIVES

by Jean Baptiste Moliere
Directed by Richard Whittaker

1973

TEN LITTLE NIGGERS

Directed by Betty Ashton

1973

A BLAST OF RASPBERRIES (Revue)

Directed by Nick Walsh/Bill Brennan

1972

THE GHOST TRAIN

by Arnold Ridley
Directed by Nick Walsh

1972

RELATIVELY SPEAKING

by Alan Ayckbourn
Directed by Richard Whittaker

1971

SWEET DISORDER

Directed by Betty Ashton

1971

LADIES IN RETIREMENT

by Edward Percy and Reginald Denham
Directed by Richard Whittaker

1970

SOME LIKE IT COLD

Directed by Betty Ashton

1970

CONVERSION OF THE ANGLO-SAXONS

Directed by Malcolm Lawson-Paul

1970

I'LL GET MY MAN

by Philip King
Directed by Richard Whittaker

1969

PEACE FROM PIETY

Directed by Betty Ashton

1969

MR HUNTER

Directed by Betty Ashton

1969

THE BROWNING VERSION

by Terence Rattigan
Directed by Betty Ashton

1969

THE PROXY

Directed by Betty Ashton

1968

RAPE OF THE BELT

by Benn W. Levy
Directed by Norman Merriott

1968

YELLOW SPARROW

Directed by Betty Ashton

1967

THE CONFEDERACY

Directed by Richard Whittaker

1967

LOVE FROM A STRANGER

by Frank Vosper
Directed by Celia Page

1966

WATCH IT, SAILOR!

by Falkland L Cary and Philip King
Directed by Betty Ashton

1966

DEAD LOSS

Directed by Norman Merriott

1966

THE WHITE SHEEP OF THE FAMILY

by L. du Garde Peach and Ian Hay
Directed by Betty Ashton

1965

OUT OF THE CROCODILE

Directed by Richard Whittaker

1965

THE AMOROUS PRAWN

by Anthony Kimmins
Directed by Norman Merriott

1964

A LADY MISLAID

Directed by Betty Ashton

1964

DOCTOR AT SEA

Directed by Richard Whittaker

1964

MURDER OUT OF TUNE

by Falkland L. Cary
Directed by Bernard Scutt

1963

THE LOVEBIRDS

Directed by Richard Whittaker

1963

LOVE IN A MIST

by Kenneth Horne
Directed by Betty Ashton

1962

DUET FOR TWO HANDS

by Mary Hayley Bell
Directed by Norman Merriott

1962

DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE

by Richard Gordon and Ted Willis
Directed by Norman Merriott

1961

SAILOR BEWARE!

by Philip King and Falkland Cary
Directed by Richard Whittaker

1961

WILD GOOSE CHASE

by Derek Benfield
Directed by Norman Merriott

1960

MURDER ON ARRIVAL

Directed by Betty Ashton

1960

BREATH OF SPRING

by Peter Coke
Directed by Richard Whittaker

1959

WORMS EYE VIEW

Directed by Betty Ashton